2020 Election | Ballot Questions

Below you will find videos & other campaign information for the two ballot questions set to appear on the ballot in Massachusetts on November 3rd



Question 1: "Right To Repair"

Question 2: Ranked-choice Voting



QUESTION 1: "RIGHT TO REPAIR"

The full language of Question 1 can be read by clicking here.

Summary

Question 1 (2020) would require manufacturers that sell motor vehicles equipped with telematics systems to install a standardized open data platform beginning with model year 2022. Vehicle owners could then access telematics system data through a mobile device application and then give consent for independent repair facilities to access that data and send commands to the system for repair, maintenance, and diagnostic testing.

Currently, the 2013 "right to repair law" exempts telematics systems from wireless accessibility by vehicle owners and independent repair facilities.

A "yes" vote:

supports requiring manufacturers that sell vehicles with telematics systems in Massachusetts to equip them with a standardized open data platform beginning with model year 2022 that vehicle owners and independent repair facilities may access to retrieve mechanical data and run diagnostics through a mobile-based application.

A "no" vote:

opposes requiring vehicles beginning with model year 2022 to be equipped with a standardized open data platform that vehicle owners and independent repair facilities may access to retrieve mechanical data and run diagnostics through a mobile-based application, thereby maintaining that vehicle owners and independent repair facilities may access mechanical and diagnostic data through a personal computer.

In support

  • Leading support: Massachusetts Right to Repair Coalition
  • Visit their website by clicking here.
  • "This is really a fight for Massachusetts consumers. Without this information, people may lose the choice to bring their car to an independent repair shop." - Tom Hickey, director of Massachusetts Right to Repair Coalition

In opposition

  • Leading opposition: Coalition for Safe and Secure Data
  • Visit their website by clicking here.
  • "This ballot question will create easy opportunities for strangers, hackers and criminals to access consumer vehicles and personal driving data–including real-time location. It will put people at risk, without doing anything to improve the consumer experience." - Conor Yunits, spokesman for the Coalition for Safe and Secure Data


QUESTION 2: RANKED-CHOICE VOTING

The full language of Question 2 can be read by clicking here.

Summary

Question 2 would enact ranked-choice voting (RCV) for primary and general elections for state executive officials, state legislators, federal congressional representatives, and certain county offices. RCV is a voting method in which voters rank candidates according to their preferences. If a candidate receives greater than 50% of all first preference votes, the candidate is declared the winner and the tabulation ends. If no candidate receives 50% of first preference votes, then the candidate receiving the fewest first preference votes is eliminated. First preference votes cast for the eliminated candidate are eliminated, and the second-preference choices indicated on those ballots are tallied as their first preference in the following round. The process is continued until a candidate wins a simple majority (50%+1) of the vote. If there is a tie for last place, the candidates' support from earlier rounds would be compared to determine who should be eliminated.[1]

Currently, statewide elections in Massachusetts use a plurality voting system. In Amherst and Easthampton, ranked-choice voting has been adopted but not implemented. Cambridge has used RCV since 1941 to elect the nine-seat city council and the six-seat school board.[2]

As of 2020, one state (Maine) had implemented RCV at the state level. Another eight states contained jurisdictions that had implemented RCV at some level. Another five states contained jurisdictions that had adopted but not yet implemented RCV in local elections.[3]

A "yes" vote:

supports enacting ranked-choice voting (RCV) for primary and general elections for state executive officials, state legislators, federal congressional and senate seats, and certain county offices beginning in 2022.

A "no" vote:

opposes changing the existing plurality voting system to ranked-choice voting for primary and general elections for state executive officials, state legislators, federal congressional and senate seats, and county offices.

In support

  • Leading support: Voter Choice Massachusetts
  • Visit their website by clicking here.
  • "Ranked choice voting puts more power into the hands of voters, where it belongs. By allowing us to rank candidates, it gives us more say at the ballot box. You will never feel your voice isn’t heard or your vote doesn’t count. We deserve a government that works for “We the people,” not for special interests or the establishment and its hand-picked candidates." - Cheryl Clyburn Crawford, executive director of MassVote

In opposition

  • Leading opposition: Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance
  • Visit their website by clicking here.
  • "Runoff elections would work fine, where there would be a second election day and the highest two vote-getters would advance to that. That allows the voters the ability — which ranked-choice, or instant-runoff voting, doesn't allow you — to have an understanding of who the final two [candidates] are to make the determinations." - Paul Craney, spokesman for Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance


Information above taken from Ballotpedia

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